The stress of prostate cancer

The prostate cancer (matepukupuku repeure) journey can have some bumps along the way. Between diagnosis, treatment, finances and relationships, there’s a lot that might keep you up at night. And as worries pile up, it’s normal to feel stressed out or anxious.

A prostate cancer diagnosis
can be stressful

Right now, you might
have persistent thoughts like:

What if the treatment doesn’t work?

What if the cancer comes back?

Why me?

These are all valid, important and personal questions. Remember that you have people in your corner (like your doctor and care team, counsellor, whānau and friends) to help you work through these feelings. It’s OK to allow yourself to be upset and talk it out.

Counselling, support and
activities to reduce stress

If your feelings of stress or anxiety are becoming overwhelming, talk to your doctor, care team or hauora provider and they can guide you towards helpful solutions. You can also check out the useful resources below.
Counselling support

For support from a trained counsellor, you can free call or text 1737, or use the Depression Helpline 0800 111 757 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

Cancer Society support &
counselling

You can also access cancer support and counselling services by visiting the Cancer Society website or calling their helpline 0800 226 237 (Monday to Friday, 8:30am to 5:00pm)

On a day-to-day basis, there are several
things you can do to be more at ease.

One of the best ways to help your whānau or yourself is by keeping in contact. Strong whanaungatanga and relationships help you:

  • keep stable

  • know that you’re valued and loved

  • get well faster

  • stay well for longer

Your relationships are very important. The break up of an important relationship, or not being able to be with someone you love can have a significant effect on your wairua (spirit).

One of the best ways to help your whānau or yourself is by keeping in contact. Strong whanaungatanga and relationships help you:

  • keep stable

  • know that you’re valued and loved

  • get well faster

  • stay well for longer

Your relationships are very important. The break up of an important relationship, or not being able to be with someone you love can have a significant effect on your wairua (spirit).

Remember, asking for help is a sign of strength. Rather than being a seen as weakness, it actually takes courage to admit that you can’t do everything alone.
Kia kaha, Kia maia, Kia manawanui.

Additional Resources

Improve your mental wellbeing

Learn how to manage stress, calm your mind or lift your mood.

Get mental health support

Access services, get support and learn about caring for your mental wellbeing

Cancer Society of New Zealand

Access cancer support nurses, one-on-one support and counselling services

Find a support group or network near you
Find information and support on
taking care of yourself and others

A resource provided by Te Hiringa Hauora
(the Health Promotion Agency)

What's next?

Now that you've read up on The stress of prostate cancer, here are some related articles to explore as you continue to build your knowledge and understanding of this topic.
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